Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid effects of steroids

Rheumatologists are usually the specialists with the most overall knowledge about vasculitis. Thus, they direct the care of patients, particularly those with chronic or severe disease. Patients with vasculitis often benefit from seeing experts in the organ systems that are or might become affected. Doctors that patients may need to see include a dermatologist (skin doctor), neurologist (expert in nervous system diseases), ophthalmologist (eye doctor), otorhinolaryngologist (ear, nose and throat doctor), nephrologist (kidney doctor) or pulmonologist (lung doctor).

Glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatories, regardless of the inflammation's cause; their primary anti-inflammatory mechanism is lipocortin-1 (annexin-1) synthesis. Lipocortin-1 both suppresses phospholipase A2 , thereby blocking eicosanoid production, and inhibits various leukocyte inflammatory events ( epithelial adhesion , emigration , chemotaxis , phagocytosis , respiratory burst , etc.). In other words, glucocorticoids not only suppress immune response, but also inhibit the two main products of inflammation, prostaglandins and leukotrienes . They inhibit prostaglandin synthesis at the level of phospholipase A2 as well as at the level of cyclooxygenase /PGE isomerase (COX-1 and COX-2), [29] the latter effect being much like that of NSAIDs , potentiating the anti-inflammatory effect.

Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid effects of steroids

glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid effects of steroids

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