Corticosteroid cream uses

2 years and older:
Cream/ointment: Apply a thin layer to the affected area once a day

12 years and older:
Lotion: Apply a thin layer to the affected area once a day

Comments:
-Safety and efficacy in pediatric patients for more than 3 weeks of use have not been established.
-This topical drug should not be applied in the diaper area if the child still requires diapers or plastic pants.
-Therapy should be discontinued when control is obtained.
-If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, reassessment of diagnosis may be needed.

Use: Relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses

Corticosteroids have been used as drug treatment for some time. Lewis Sarett of Merck & Co. was the first to synthesize cortisone, using a complicated 36-step process that started with deoxycholic acid, which was extracted from ox bile . [43] The low efficiency of converting deoxycholic acid into cortisone led to a cost of US $200 per gram. Russell Marker , at Syntex , discovered a much cheaper and more convenient starting material, diosgenin from wild Mexican yams . His conversion of diosgenin into progesterone by a four-step process now known as Marker degradation was an important step in mass production of all steroidal hormones, including cortisone and chemicals used in hormonal contraception . [44] In 1952, . Peterson and . Murray of Upjohn developed a process that used Rhizopus mold to oxidize progesterone into a compound that was readily converted to cortisone. [45] The ability to cheaply synthesize large quantities of cortisone from the diosgenin in yams resulted in a rapid drop in price to US $6 per gram, falling to $ per gram by 1980. Percy Julian's research also aided progress in the field. [46] The exact nature of cortisone's anti-inflammatory action remained a mystery for years after, however, until the leukocyte adhesion cascade and the role of phospholipase A2 in the production of prostaglandins and leukotrienes was fully understood in the early 1980s.

Triamcinolone acetonide (the active ingredient) can be absorbed through the skin, especially if it is covered with a bandage or similar covering. It is possible to absorb enough triamcinolone acetonide through the skin to make you sick. It may cause unusual tiredness, weight loss, muscle weakness, headache, swelling in the lower extremities, increased thirst, redistribution of body fat (often seen as “moon face”), decreased ability to fight off infection, difficulty sleeping, skin bruising, joint pain, and vision problems. Contact your doctor if you have any of these symptoms.

Corticosteroid cream uses

corticosteroid cream uses

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