Asthma and inhaled corticosteroids and shorter in stature

The inflammation in asthma involves both the large and the small airways. This study was designed to examine whether mometasone delivered from a dry powder inhaler would improve those parameters thought to reflect patency and obstruction of the small airways (diameter <2 mm). Subjects with mild to moderate asthma, only receiving short-acting beta-agonists, underwent baseline assessment, and then were randomized to receive for 12 weeks either mometasone 400 micrograms once daily in the evening or matching placebo. Outcomes assessed included clinical measures and measures of airway responsiveness and inflammation included methacholine sensitivity (concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV(1)] [PC(20)]), exhaled nitric oxide, serum ECP, and sputum eosinophils. Pulmonary function was assessed by spirometry, plethysmography, and forced oscillometry. Measures of small airway patency included single breath nitrogen washout and air trapping on expiratory high-resolution computed tomography. Results were available on 12 adult subjects who received mometasone and 14 subjects who received placebo. Among tests reflecting small airway patency, the forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of vital capacity was significantly improved by mometasone compared with placebo (+9% versus -6%; p = and the closing volume over forced vital capacity (FVC; -2% versus 0%; p = ). Other results significantly favoring mometasone over placebo included FEV(1), FVC, PC(20), and . and . peak expiratory flows, and albuterol use. Mometasone delivered by a dry powder inhaler improved asthma control and pulmonary function in tests reflecting both large and small airways.

Patients’ inhaler technique can be improved by brief education, including a physical demonstration, from a health professional or other person trained in correct technique. 68 The best way to train patients to use their inhalers correctly is one-to-one training by a healthcare professional (. nurse, pharmacist, GP, specialist), that involves both verbal instruction and physical demonstration. 74 ,   62 ,   75 ,   76  Patients do not learn to use their inhalers properly just by reading the manufacturer's leaflet. 75 An effective method is to assess the individual's technique by comparing with a checklist specific to the type of inhaler, and then, after training in correct technique, to provide written instructions about errors (. a sticker attached to the device). 60 ,   73

It’s important to know the signs and symptoms of respiratory tract infections and to call your health care provider immediately for diagnosis and treatment. For instance, you might have symptoms of increased shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, or wheezing with a bronchial infection. In people who don’t have asthma, the bronchial infection may not trigger the same debilitating symptoms. Know your body and understand warning signs that an infection might be starting. Then take the proper medications as prescribed to eliminate the infection and regain control of your asthma and health.

Asthma and inhaled corticosteroids and shorter in stature

asthma and inhaled corticosteroids and shorter in stature

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asthma and inhaled corticosteroids and shorter in statureasthma and inhaled corticosteroids and shorter in statureasthma and inhaled corticosteroids and shorter in statureasthma and inhaled corticosteroids and shorter in statureasthma and inhaled corticosteroids and shorter in stature